Mike Rhoades Show, Media Minutes & Pressers

VCU Heel

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Lets say in the 2024/25 season, we have 13 prime scholarship players already signed, and Watkins and Banks want to come back as well. This would be an area where a local business('s) could pay Watkins and Banks enough $$ to cover tuition/room/ board/ expenses to make it feasible to return and allow the roster to expand to 15 or more scholarship-Level players. is that a plausible strategy?
I‘m not sure that would be allowed under NCAA scholarship rules. After being on scholarship for 4 years, I‘m not sure a guy can pay his own way and not count towards the scholarship limit.

I’m also not sure that this is something that we would want. It will become hard to recruit quality high school players into your program if there is very little playing time available because of overloaded rosters.
 

BradRamFan

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Regarding students making money off their name, merchandise, etc.......how does this or can it be differentiated from a booster simply handing a player that signs with a program a bucket full of money with an additional promise of a stream of income during their time with the team? Or can a player set up an LLC or something and just have a booster invest a bucket of money into it and a continual stream of "investment".
How is that any different than a booster buying $50,000 or some other strong azz amount worth of hats with the players name , that the player is selling every 6 months? Or the player going to office depot, buying a $5 pack of printer paper, cutting it into strips and selling them as bookmarks to a booster for $50,000 every 6 months?
Is someone that donates $5, $10, or $100 to his university considered a "booster" and thus not allowed to buy any player's company sold merchandise?
 

Ramdog

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Regarding students making money off their name, merchandise, etc.......how does this or can it be differentiated from a booster simply handing a player that signs with a program a bucket full of money with an additional promise of a stream of income during their time with the team? Or can a player set up an LLC or something and just have a booster invest a bucket of money into it and a continual stream of "investment".
How is that any different than a booster buying $50,000 or some other strong azz amount worth of hats with the players name , that the player is selling every 6 months? Or the player going to office depot, buying a $5 pack of printer paper, cutting it into strips and selling them as bookmarks to a booster for $50,000 every 6 months?
Is someone that donates $5, $10, or $100 to his university considered a "booster" and thus not allowed to buy any player's company sold merchandise?
Rules?
There are no rules
 

N Mollen

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Are there limits on squad size (not scholarships)? I don't think so. I remember seeing UNC team pictures and they look like they have 30 walk-ons lol.
 

VCU Heel

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Are there limits on squad size (not scholarships)? I don't think so. I remember seeing UNC team pictures and they look like they have 30 walk-ons lol.
13 scholarship limit. There are limits to how many you can dress at home vs. on the road vs. tournament games. Sometimes walk-ons don’t get to dress.

But once a player has been on scholarship, he may have to count as a scholarship. And the NCAA might have to adjust these rules. If schools start using loopholes to have 15-20 basketball players or 120+ football players that are essentially on scholarship, then they could change the rules on number of players.
 

N Mollen

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13 scholarship limit. There are limits to how many you can dress at home vs. on the road vs. tournament games. Sometimes walk-ons don’t get to dress.

But once a player has been on scholarship, he may have to count as a scholarship. And the NCAA might have to adjust these rules. If schools start using loopholes to have 15-20 basketball players or 120+ football players that are essentially on scholarship, then they could change the rules on number of players.
So what you're saying is the NCAA and its member institutions might conspire with each other to suppress competition in the market for college basketball players by imposing an artificial cap on the number of team members?
 

VCU Heel

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So what you're saying is the NCAA and its member institutions might conspire with each other to suppress competition in the market for college basketball players by imposing an artificial cap on the number of team members?
There have always been limits. Decades ago teams like Alabama and Nebraska would have over 120+ players on their football roster. They would bring in kids that they had no intention of playing just to keep them from playing at rivals.

The NCAA is the schools. Members creating rules for themselves isn’t a conspiracy and those rules can enhance competition instead of suppressing it.
 

N Mollen

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There have always been limits. Decades ago teams like Alabama and Nebraska would have over 120+ players on their football roster. They would bring in kids that they had no intention of playing just to keep them from playing at rivals.

The NCAA is the schools. Members creating rules for themselves isn’t a conspiracy and those rules can enhance competition instead of suppressing it.
There have always been Sherman Act violations though, right? Am I right?

Each individual member making decisions for themselves is competition. The schools making decisions collectively, though the NCAA, is, what . . . say it with me . . . COLLUSION!
 

VCU Heel

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There have always been Sherman Act violations though, right? Am I right?

Each individual member making decisions for themselves is competition. The schools making decisions collectively, though the NCAA, is, what . . . say it with me . . . COLLUSION!
Go ahead with that. VCU basketball will be dead.

You also don’t seem to know the definition of collusion.

secret or illegal cooperation or conspiracy, especially in order to cheat or deceive others.”

Cooperation and collusion are not the same thing.
 

VCU Heel

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That may well be the case, because I thought I heard you cheering NCAA v. Alston. Obviously I was mistaken.
I think people should be able to make money off of NIL. I also think the NCAA has the right to regulate the number of players on a school’s roster. Those 2 points aren’t inconsistent.
 
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