News New Downtown Arena

Mar 16, 2014
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I work in Innsbrook. 20 years from now that area will be a crap hole. The traffic is terrible, and restaurants are already closing because there is too much competition. The school district in the area is top notch, but I know of 4 families in the last year that have moved out of the area because of traffic and over crowding. Whether it be Richmond or the surrounding area, the metro needs a new arena. Their are plenty of people in the area to draw from not just Short Pump/Innsbrook.
Innsbrook after hours is literally just an open field and a very average looking tarp stage canopy. I'm wondering if you've ever even been there if you're calling it an arena. With their success, they're proposing an arena there in the near future. Theyre already signing some above average artists like Nelly, Roots and Ludacris. The county sees it as a viable option and so do sponsors. But no! They're all wrong because "Newboy" thinks otherwise.

I work in Richmond and live in innsbrook. This is hands down the best place to stay around Richmond. City corporate downtown is now down to 1 lane because one lane is for cyclists and another two for street parking. The detours take 20 minutes to go around one block when there is tiny bit construction. And there is always construction somewhere as that area is designated underground for utility so one or the other utility is digging often and always. Already choked up broad street is now one less lane due to the Pulse system. It's a nightmare. Parking is a nightmare anywhere in the city.

I'm not against a new arena in the city however it's too far to walk from monroe park campus for it to be a viable option for VCU basketball. They'd have to bus people to and from campus.

Let's not even get into safety at night in the city or good roads. City has no money because it makes terrible choices and spends crazy money on unneeded things or fails to adequately priorarize spending. The whole cyclist lane thing is costing a fortune while the school system is crumbling. What parent wants to send their kids to city schools unless they cant help it? It's a mess.

Counties are rich and the city is piss poor. There is a reason why.
 
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Mar 18, 2012
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The Richmond housing market is starting to overheat. Growth in the area, and specifically the city, is ramping up quickly. That is mostly a good thing, but there's a serious downside if the issue isn't planned for in advance. There's pent up demand that will make the cost of living here start to get quickly out of control if we don't take steps to alleviate the pressure. You do this by building housing: dense, vertical, and near mass transit. This keeps (some) traffic off the roads and freeways so that congestion is less of an issue. We need to plan ahead before it's 2030 and we're the next Austin (I lived there, trust me, that's not a good thing).
Richmond will only become a renters market until they address real issues like schools and a permanent tax base, and not foolish ones like tearing down statues and building bus lines that go no where. YOUNG people don't invest in the city, they spend their money on rent, beer, Amazon, and Uber. The public schools are a disaster, and unless you can afford a private school, people head for the counties when they decide to get SERIOUS with their lives. The housing availability will NEVER get out of control, the substandard public school system will take care of that.
 

Havoc2Ut2

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Nov 15, 2014
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Richmond will only become a renters market until they address real issues like schools and a permanent tax base, and not foolish ones like tearing down statues and building bus lines that go no where. YOUNG people don't invest in the city, they spend their money on rent, beer, Amazon, and Uber. The public schools are a disaster, and unless you can afford a private school, people head for the counties when they decide to get SERIOUS with their lives. The housing availability will NEVER get out of control, the substandard public school system will take care of that.
No one with children will live within the city limits until there are schools worthy of teaching their kids. Young people with kids just don't have the money to send their kids to private schools. This is why new housing isn't being built. There's not enough demand for it. This has been the reality since I came to RVA in 1982. Doesn't appear that the city will do anything about the schools while they keep building stuff that few will buy.

The only thing that could change this is VCU's continued takeover and gentrification of downtown RVA. Politicians over the years have proven beyond a doubt that they will never be able to do it.
 

MobileMunchies

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Nov 2, 2013
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A brand new, cutting edge, large, truly green venue would be fairly unmatched in our area, and a specially anticipated landing spto for many artists. Mega artists. With a 7% admissions tax here, this city has missed out on tons of revenue over the years not having something like this. This idea is past due. It's what this city lacks. Stealing bookings from area venues is quite possible, outdoor venues have issues, many.. this would be a golden destination for many shows and artists. Who wouldn't wish to play in one of the world's newest, greenest venues? And I believe it'd be foolish with something like this in town to deny VCU Hoops would at least eventually have it's eyes on playing there, being the hottest ticket in town, and it being the hottest venue anywhere around here.. with VCU surrounding and enveloping everything in this city, especially where it comes to recruiting and program growth, parking, and ticket sales. Compare walking into The Stu with a highly valued recruit, to walking into something like this. It's the same difference as walking into Franklin St Gym as opposed to the BDC. Game. Changer. And as a 48 year long resident of this city I more than welcome it.
 

BracketForecast

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May 9, 2011
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No one with children will live within the city limits until there are schools worthy of teaching their kids. Young people with kids just don't have the money to send their kids to private schools. This is why new housing isn't being built. There's not enough demand for it. This has been the reality since I came to RVA in 1982. Doesn't appear that the city will do anything about the schools while they keep building stuff that few will buy.

The only thing that could change this is VCU's continued takeover and gentrification of downtown RVA. Politicians over the years have proven beyond a doubt that they will never be able to do it.
.....are you kidding me? Richmond City has been growing faster than Chesterfield or Henrico for the entire decade.
 

SWV

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Jan 10, 2016
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Everyone I know who has recently moved downtown either is young without kids, or empty nesters. People I know who have moved out of downtown have started having kids. I know a lot of people who have moved into downtown (more than have moved out), but none of them have kids.
 
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BracketForecast

Top Member
May 9, 2011
5,142
6,350
Richmond City
Population estimates, July 1, 2017, (V2017) 227,032
Population estimates base, April 1, 2010, (V2017) 204,271
Population, percent change - April 1, 2010 (estimates base) to July 1, 2017, (V2017) 11.1%

Chesterfield County
Population estimates, July 1, 2017, (V2017) 343,599
Population estimates base, April 1, 2010, (V2017) 316,239
Population, percent change - April 1, 2010 (estimates base) to July 1, 2017, (V2017) 8.7%

Henrico County
Population estimates, July 1, 2017, (V2017) 327,898
Population estimates base, April 1, 2010, (V2017) 306,868
Population, percent change - April 1, 2010 (estimates base) to July 1, 2017, (V2017) 6.9%
 
May 4, 2012
7,330
4,498
.....are you kidding me? Richmond City has been growing faster than Chesterfield or Henrico for the entire decade.
Everyone I know who has recently moved downtown either is young without kids, or empty nesters. People I know who have moved out of downtown have started having kids. I know a lot of people who have moved into downtown (more than have moved out), but none of them have kids.
You are confirming one another. County's down because all those kids are done with school and gone. Empty nesters like so many I know moving back in to ditch yardwork.
 

Havoc2Ut2

Top Member
Nov 15, 2014
12,606
19,945
Richmond City
Population estimates, July 1, 2017, (V2017) 227,032
Population estimates base, April 1, 2010, (V2017) 204,271
Population, percent change - April 1, 2010 (estimates base) to July 1, 2017, (V2017) 11.1%

Chesterfield County
Population estimates, July 1, 2017, (V2017) 343,599
Population estimates base, April 1, 2010, (V2017) 316,239
Population, percent change - April 1, 2010 (estimates base) to July 1, 2017, (V2017) 8.7%

Henrico County
Population estimates, July 1, 2017, (V2017) 327,898
Population estimates base, April 1, 2010, (V2017) 306,868
Population, percent change - April 1, 2010 (estimates base) to July 1, 2017, (V2017) 6.9%
Yep, numbers...Added a whole 17k people in 17 years. Likely a large portion of them VCU students few of which have kids on their mind for many years. That's some serious growth. What else grows that fast besides my Habanero plants on the deck?
 

Ramdog

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Feb 10, 2009
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Holy $hitt...I think some of you haven't been in the city for years based on these posts. Richmond...despite its crap public school is on fire...property values are soaring and is a destination city. Like any City it has its warts but man some of the comments are way off base.
 

Ram14

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Jun 20, 2011
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The only thing it's missing is a walk bridge across broad...:P

Kidding aside, I would love to see this, but agree 17.5k is overly ambitious.
No, the number is necessary to land any of the events the city wishes to be in competition to host. Concerts in Richmond and not just in Charlottesville, hosting A-10, hosting holiday tournaments,... back to bidding to host 1st and 2nd Rounds. Richmond is growing and VCU is growing in leaps and bounds. I think building under that mark is more a set up for future failure than having some 2nd tier empty seats for many events.

I also think their proposal for the tax application to the project will stop this from moving forward. I appreciate those on the Council that are cautious, but I also see no results over the last few decades in many areas because of shortsightedness.
 

Ram14

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Jun 20, 2011
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Ambitious idea but not happening.
It does seem unlikely that the tax part of this will be acceptable, sadly it could become yet another boat our city misses. Redeveloping that area and having an arena such as that are a necessary step for Richmond. Whenever a solution has been found, I still see VCU being a part of it even in a small way. The Stu would still be used for most games, but a few games would be played there. Graduations possibly would be moved there and other special events. The key uses will be as a part of the convention center, thus allowing us to bid on larger gatherings and events. Someone above said they felt this was more important than the baseball stadium for Richmond to continue on a path of growth and development and I totally agree.
 
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Ramcounter

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Dec 7, 2011
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Sometimes doing nothing is highly underrated. So many of these arena/ stadium deals have turned into massive boondoggles.

https://sports.vice.com/en_us/artic...and-the-braves-worst-sports-stadium-deal-ever

Oh, and we'll always have the Cincinnati Bengals deal that forced Hamilton County to sell a public hospital to pay off its NFL stadium bills. If that's not a worst-case scenario, what is?
Like Glendale's deal for the NHL's Arizona Coyotes, a scheme that ended up costing the city $220 million in arena debt, plus $50 million in operating-cost subsidies to keep the team in town, plus another $30 million in more operating-cost subsidiesover two more years—requiring Glendale to cut staffing of every city department to pay for it—and now looks certain to end with the team leaving town anyway, possibly for as much as $750 million in additional sales-tax kickbacks from the state of Arizona.