Staff Shaka to Marquette (#DoneDeal)

VCU94MCV98

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Finally, the same could be said about almost all HC's we've had that arent named JD Barnett or Dana Kirk. Maybe Chuck No, or Anthony Grant. All others "could stand to improve as a gamely coach".
A fair statement. What I meant to convey but failed to express fully is that Shaka's reputation as a gameday coach is, in my opinion, inflated (understandably so, given his recruiting prowess and VCU's magical FF run) when compared to the actual tactical ability that he has displayed game in game out over the course of many seasons, not just during his early years.
 

PRock

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A fair statement. What I meant to convey but failed to express fully is that Shaka's reputation as a gameday coach is, in my opinion, inflated (understandably so, given his recruiting prowess and VCU's magical FF run) when compared to the actual tactical ability that he has displayed game in game out over the course of many seasons, not just during his early years.
Out of curiousity, who are the benchmarks for “gameday” abilities in your opinion and what differentiates them from the pack? Not necessarily disputing your points, but do want to understand the standards.
 

VCU85

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The problem is Shaka still hasn't improved as a head coach, and I really wanted him to succeed at UT. He is a good recruiter, and motivator of kids with a chip on their shoulder. 4-5 star receuits were not buying into his brand of basketball, which unfortunately is a one trick pony act.
 

VCU94MCV98

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Out of curiousity, who are the benchmarks for “gameday” abilities in your opinion and what differentiates them from the pack? Not necessarily disputing your points, but do want to understand the standards.
First, I will say that I'm the furthest thing from a basketball savant or tactician. The nuances of the game are mysteries to me. That being said, even I can recognize good gameday coaching when I see it. If the press was working and the outside shots were falling, Shaka's teams looked and performed great. If Plan A didnt' work, however, there didn't seem to be an effective Plan B in many cases. This was particularly evident in games against P5s, with the notable exception of the FF run.

Some of the particular things that I noticed, even as an admittedly unsophisticated observer:

1. Obstinate commitment to the press, even when opposing PGs were breaking it with ease and exposing the back end of the defense to easy dunks.

2. No offensive sophistication. Running the weave every possession. Reliance on taking 3s, even when the shots weren't falling. Allowing/forcing key players to play hero ball (see "Tre and Pray").

3. Minimal/no adjustments made during timeouts or halftime.

4. Underutilization of big men (this even occurred at UT with 5 star bigs).

As noted above, these trends run through Shaka's teams to this day. It will be interesting to see if his MU squads are appreciably different. Are these issues restricted solely to the coaching performance of one Shaka Smart? Of course not.
 
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VCU Heel

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First, I will say that I'm the furthest thing from a basketball savant or tactician. The nuances of the game are mysteries to me. That being said, even I can recognize good gameday coaching when I see it. If the press was working and the outside shots were falling, Shaka's teams looked and performed great. If Plan A didnt' work, however, there didn't seem to be an effective Plan B in many cases. This was particularly evident in games against P5s, with the notable exception of the FF run.

Some of the particular things that I noticed, even as an admittedly unsophisticated observer:

1. Obstinate commitment to the press, even when opposing PGs were breaking it with ease and exposing the back end of the defense to easy dunks.

2. No offensive sophistication. Running the weave every possession. Reliance on taking 3s, even when the shots weren't falling. Allowing/forcing key players to play hero ball (see "Tre and Pray").

3. Minimal/no adjustments made during timeouts or halftime.

4. Underutilization of big men (this even occurred at UT with 5 star bigs).

As noted above, these trends run through Shaka's teams to this day. It will be interesting to see if his MU squads are appreciable different. Are these issues restricted solely to the coaching performance of one Shaka Smart? Of course not.
#1 was my biggest issue with Shaka the last few years at VCU. I think the Havoc name brand became such a big thing that not pressing was viewed as a sign a defeat. But there are teams/players that can’t be pressed. Michigan in the NCAA tourney was one of them. That team was unpressable.
 
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First, I will say that I'm the furthest thing from a basketball savant or tactician. The nuances of the game are mysteries to me. That being said, even I can recognize good gameday coaching when I see it. If the press was working and the outside shots were falling, Shaka's teams looked and performed great. If Plan A didnt' work, however, there didn't seem to be an effective Plan B in many cases. This was particularly evident in games against P5s, with the notable exception of the FF run.

Some of the particular things that I noticed, even as an admittedly unsophisticated observer:

1. Obstinate commitment to the press, even when opposing PGs were breaking it with ease and exposing the back end of the defense to easy dunks.

2. No offensive sophistication. Running the weave every possession. Reliance on taking 3s, even when the shots weren't falling. Allowing/forcing key players to play hero ball (see "Tre and Pray").

3. Minimal/no adjustments made during timeouts or halftime.

4. Underutilization of big men (this even occurred at UT with 5 star bigs).

As noted above, these trends run through Shaka's teams to this day. It will be interesting to see if his MU squads are appreciably different. Are these issues restricted solely to the coaching performance of one Shaka Smart? Of course not.
I will buy most of that.

I would say that in terms of riding a single player, the three highest usage percentages for a player since that stat has been available have been under Mike Rhoades.
And while Smart’s VCU teams typically didn’t shoot the ball that well, they did score. Points per possession would measure how efficient you are. The 3 lowest seasons going back through Chapel have all been under Mike Rhoades.

It will be interesting to see how Shaka does at MU. I hope he does well, he seems like good guy. Coaches other than Wade continuing to flounder after leaving VCU kind of makes it look like this is an easy place to win (school that spends on basketball in leagues with schools who don’t).
 
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WillWeaverRVA

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I would say that in terms of riding a single player, the three highest usage percentages for a player since that stat has been available have been under Mike Rhoades.
I’m kind of surprised at this stat considering that Wade played JeQuan Lewis 36-40 minutes a game on a regular basis during his second and last season here.
 

Ramaholic

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VCU may not have had the academic pedigree SS and Maya wanted. Richmond may not have had cultural attractions other cities have or be as close to his home. But the VCU program was a near perfect fit for SS for him to succeed as a coach. I think he will search for the remainder of his career to find what he left at VCU.

An old Chinese proverb tells the story of Won Ton. He lived many years ago in China when they had a rigid caste system that allowed little socioeconomic mobility. Won Ton was a working man from humble working class family. But he wanted to be rich. So at an early age, Won Ton went to be a servant for the richest man in the kingdom, hoping to learn from him. He worked from sun up to sun down in the fields under the hot sun. For his labors he was given shelter, food (usually a bowl of soup) and whatever wisdom he good learn from speaking with his master -the richest man in the kingdom.
After several years, his master taught him many lessons and Won Ton went out in the world to make his fortune. Won Ton used the lessons he learned from the richest man he worked for and in a few decades Won Ton became equally wealthy. He had palaces, a beautiful wife, all the luxuries one could afford at the time. But Won Ton, wasn't happy. He remembered longingly for the days he worked from sun up to sun down and how he would eat the soup he was given at the end of the day. The soup was the most delicious meal he ever had. That regimen of working all day in the sun, learning, growing and getting wiser, was exhausting. Completing his work and eating the bowl of soup was the happiest time of his day.
So when Won Ton became successful, he hired the best chefs and farmers to try to replicate the soup. But everytime he sipped it he would spit it out and yell at his staff and say "this is not the soup!! It is wrong". After years of trying to replicate the soup,one of his servants sought out the rich man who hired Won Ton so many years ago and brought him to Won Ton's palace. The rich man made the soup and brought it to Won Ton. Won tasted it and spit it out stating it was wrong and not the same soup. The rich man, who employed Won Ton so many years ago, wisely said :The soup is the same, You are the one that has changed" Won Tons happiest moments were growing, learning, working hard all day and dreaming of his goals. That is what made the soup so satisfying.
That is the story of Won Ton soup and of SS and VCU.
 
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AlienAiden

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VCU may not have had the academic pedigree SS and Maya wanted. Richmond may not have had cultural attractions other cities have or be as close to his home. But the VCU program was a near perfect fit for SS for him to succeed as a coach. I think he will search for the remainder of his career to find what he left at VCU.

An old Chinese proverb tells the story of Won Ton. He lived many years ago in China when they had a rigid caste system that allowed little socioeconomic mobility. Won Ton was a working man from humble working class family. But he wanted to be rich. So at an early age, Won Ton went to be a servant for the richest man in the kingdom, hoping to learn from him. He worked from sun up to sun down in the fields under the hot sun. For his labors he was given shelter, food (usually a bowl of soup) and whatever wisdom he good learn from speaking with his master -the richest man in the kingdom.
After several years, his master taught him many lessons and Won Ton went out in the world to make his fortune. Won Ton used the lessons he learned from the richest man hew worked for and in a few decades Won Ton became equally wealthy. He had palaces, a beautiful wife, all the luxuries one could afford at the time. But Won Ton, wasn't happy. He remembered longingly for the days he worked from sun up to sun down and how he would eat the soup he was given at the end of the day. That regimen of working all day in the sun, learning, growing and getting wiser, was exhausting. Completing his work and eating the bowl of soup was the happiest time of his day.
So when Won Ton became successful, he hired the best chefs and farmers to try to replicate the soup. But everytime he sipped it he would spit it out and yell at his staff and say "this is not the soup!! It is wrong". After years of trying to replicate the soup,one of his servants sought out the rich man who hired Won Ton so many years ago and brought him to Won Ton's palace. The rich man made the soup and brought it to Won Ton. Won tasted it and spit it out stating it was wrong and not the same soup. The rich man, who employed Won Ton so many years ago, wisely said :The soup is the same, You are the one that has changed" Won Tons happiest moments were growing, learning, working hard all day and dreaming of his goals. That is what made the soup so satisfying.
That is the story of Won Ton soup and of SS and VCU.
I like Pho.
 

PRock

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First, I will say that I'm the furthest thing from a basketball savant or tactician. The nuances of the game are mysteries to me. That being said, even I can recognize good gameday coaching when I see it. If the press was working and the outside shots were falling, Shaka's teams looked and performed great. If Plan A didnt' work, however, there didn't seem to be an effective Plan B in many cases. This was particularly evident in games against P5s, with the notable exception of the FF run.

Some of the particular things that I noticed, even as an admittedly unsophisticated observer:

1. Obstinate commitment to the press, even when opposing PGs were breaking it with ease and exposing the back end of the defense to easy dunks.

2. No offensive sophistication. Running the weave every possession. Reliance on taking 3s, even when the shots weren't falling. Allowing/forcing key players to play hero ball (see "Tre and Pray").

3. Minimal/no adjustments made during timeouts or halftime.

4. Underutilization of big men (this even occurred at UT with 5 star bigs).

As noted above, these trends run through Shaka's teams to this day. It will be interesting to see if his MU squads are appreciably different. Are these issues restricted solely to the coaching performance of one Shaka Smart? Of course not.
Appreciate the thoughts and can see a couple of those points as it relates to Shaka. My question was more about who you think sets the standard as a bench coach….I know a few folks around here, have a picture of Mark Schmidt on their night stand and at least one poster is having an affair with David Cox—Ironically, I’ve heard from friends in the coaching profession that Rick Barnes is one of the elite game coaches and I’d probably take Izzo for one game if my life was on the line.

Mainly curious as to what good looks like to people, as it is a moving target. Davidson fans complain constantly about McKillop’s unwillingness to adjust in game, but most competing A10 fans seem to genuflect whenever his name comes up. People I respect and who know the game from the inside say that Shaka is a very good teacher and runs a pretty sophisticated program. One buddy who is pretty close to Shaka on a personal basis, says if anything, he tries to do too much for college kids— which is part of the issues he had at UT, he was running a program that takes a few seasons to master with several guys who didn’t plan on staying with it that long.

Shaka has a pretty good track record of getting guys NBA ready, who had no or limited prospects for the league before playing for him. To me, that is quite telling as to how good a coach he is…..it worked wonderfully here, he had mixed results at UT—though a good draft track record. Agree, it will be interesting to see how things evolve at Marquette.
 
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VCU may not have had the academic pedigree SS and Maya wanted. Richmond may not have had cultural attractions other cities have or be as close to his home. But the VCU program was a near perfect fit for SS for him to succeed as a coach. I think he will search for the remainder of his career to find what he left at VCU.

An old Chinese proverb tells the story of Won Ton. He lived many years ago in China when they had a rigid caste system that allowed little socioeconomic mobility. Won Ton was a working man from humble working class family. But he wanted to be rich. So at an early age, Won Ton went to be a servant for the richest man in the kingdom, hoping to learn from him. He worked from sun up to sun down in the fields under the hot sun. For his labors he was given shelter, food (usually a bowl of soup) and whatever wisdom he good learn from speaking with his master -the richest man in the kingdom.
After several years, his master taught him many lessons and Won Ton went out in the world to make his fortune. Won Ton used the lessons he learned from the richest man hew worked for and in a few decades Won Ton became equally wealthy. He had palaces, a beautiful wife, all the luxuries one could afford at the time. But Won Ton, wasn't happy. He remembered longingly for the days he worked from sun up to sun down and how he would eat the soup he was given at the end of the day. That regimen of working all day in the sun, learning, growing and getting wiser, was exhausting. Completing his work and eating the bowl of soup was the happiest time of his day.
So when Won Ton became successful, he hired the best chefs and farmers to try to replicate the soup. But everytime he sipped it he would spit it out and yell at his staff and say "this is not the soup!! It is wrong". After years of trying to replicate the soup,one of his servants sought out the rich man who hired Won Ton so many years ago and brought him to Won Ton's palace. The rich man made the soup and brought it to Won Ton. Won tasted it and spit it out stating it was wrong and not the same soup. The rich man, who employed Won Ton so many years ago, wisely said :The soup is the same, You are the one that has changed" Won Tons happiest moments were growing, learning, working hard all day and dreaming of his goals. That is what made the soup so satisfying.
That is the story of Won Ton soup and of SS and VCU.
The first part is very a very interesting and wise opinion.

However, I don’t care for Chinese proverbs, and I think Won Ton soup is the most pointless dish I have ever tried.
 
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VCU may not have had the academic pedigree SS and Maya wanted. Richmond may not have had cultural attractions other cities have or be as close to his home. But the VCU program was a near perfect fit for SS for him to succeed as a coach. I think he will search for the remainder of his career to find what he left at VCU.

An old Chinese proverb tells the story of Won Ton. He lived many years ago in China when they had a rigid caste system that allowed little socioeconomic mobility. Won Ton was a working man from humble working class family. But he wanted to be rich. So at an early age, Won Ton went to be a servant for the richest man in the kingdom, hoping to learn from him. He worked from sun up to sun down in the fields under the hot sun. For his labors he was given shelter, food (usually a bowl of soup) and whatever wisdom he good learn from speaking with his master -the richest man in the kingdom.
After several years, his master taught him many lessons and Won Ton went out in the world to make his fortune. Won Ton used the lessons he learned from the richest man hew worked for and in a few decades Won Ton became equally wealthy. He had palaces, a beautiful wife, all the luxuries one could afford at the time. But Won Ton, wasn't happy. He remembered longingly for the days he worked from sun up to sun down and how he would eat the soup he was given at the end of the day. That regimen of working all day in the sun, learning, growing and getting wiser, was exhausting. Completing his work and eating the bowl of soup was the happiest time of his day.
So when Won Ton became successful, he hired the best chefs and farmers to try to replicate the soup. But everytime he sipped it he would spit it out and yell at his staff and say "this is not the soup!! It is wrong". After years of trying to replicate the soup,one of his servants sought out the rich man who hired Won Ton so many years ago and brought him to Won Ton's palace. The rich man made the soup and brought it to Won Ton. Won tasted it and spit it out stating it was wrong and not the same soup. The rich man, who employed Won Ton so many years ago, wisely said :The soup is the same, You are the one that has changed" Won Tons happiest moments were growing, learning, working hard all day and dreaming of his goals. That is what made the soup so satisfying.
That is the story of Won Ton soup and of SS and VCU.
AHHH SOOOO
 

mrgeode

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I’m kind of surprised at this stat considering that Wade played JeQuan Lewis 36-40 minutes a game on a regular basis during his second and last season here.
That can be evidence of either a preferred style from the coach, a preferred style from a ball-dominant player, or a reflection of overall offensive talent. JQ played a ton of minutes out of necessity but you have to look at the other options while he was here, then do the same for Mike with JT and Marcus Evans's first year of availability. Reasonable people can disagree on how Mike managed the offense on those teams, but we undeniably did lean on Justin and Marcus for a ton of scoring, rightly or wrongly. I give him a pass for last year - if anything Bones should've gotten more shots.
 
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