Supreme Court Decision on College Athlete compensation

Ramaholic

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Since we brought up Pickens, this is too good not too share. Very wise and heartfelt words he left us on how short and precious life is.

The following message from T. Boone Pickens was written prior to his passing on September 11, 2019.

If you are reading this, I have passed on from this world — not as big a deal for you as it was for me.
In my final months, I came to the sad reality that my life really did have a fourth quarter and the clock really would run out on me. I took the time to convey some thoughts that reflect back on my rich and full life.
I was able to amass 1.9 million Linkedin followers. On Twitter, more than 145,000 (thanks, Drake). This is my goodbye to each of you.
One question I was asked time and again: What is it that you will leave behind?
That’s at the heart of one of my favorite poems, “Indispensable Man,” which Saxon White Kessinger wrote in 1959. Here are a few stanzas that get to the heart of the matter:
Sometime when you feel that your going
Would leave an unfillable hole,
Just follow these simple instructions
And see how they humble your soul;
Take a bucket and fill it with water,
Put your hand in it up to the wrist,
Pull it out and the hole that’s remaining
Is a measure of how you’ll be missed.
You can splash all you wish when you enter,
You may stir up the water galore,
But stop and you’ll find that in no time
It looks quite the same as before.

You be the judge of how long the bucket remembers me.
I’ve long recognized the power of effective communication. That’s why in my later years I began to reflect on the many life lessons I learned along the way, and shared them with all who would listen.
Fortunately, I found the young have a thirst for this message. Many times over the years, I was fortunate enough to speak at student commencement ceremonies, and that gave me the chance to look out into a sea of the future and share some of these thoughts with young minds. My favorite of these speeches included my grandchildren in the audience.
What I would tell them was this Depression-era baby from tiny Holdenville, Oklahoma — that wide expanse where the pavement ends, the West begins, and the Rock Island crosses the Frisco — lived a pretty good life.
In those speeches, I’d always offer these future leaders a deal: I would trade them my wealth and success, my 68,000-acre ranch and private jet, in exchange for their seat in the audience. That way, I told them, I’d get the opportunity to start over, experience every opportunity America has to offer.
It’s your shot now.
If I had to single out one piece of advice that’s guided me through life, most likely it would be from my grandmother, Nellie Molonson. She always made a point of making sure I understood that on the road to success, there’s no point in blaming others when you fail.
Here’s how she put it:
“Sonny, I don’t care who you are. Some day you’re going to have to sit on your own bottom.”
After more than half a century in the energy business, her advice has proven itself to be spot-on time and time again. My failures? I never have any doubt whom they can be traced back to. My successes? Most likely the same guy.
Never forget where you come from. I was fortunate to receive the right kind of direction, leadership, and work ethic — first in Holdenville, then as a teen in Amarillo, Texas, and continuing in college at what became Oklahoma State University. I honored the values my family instilled in me, and was honored many times over by the success they allowed me to achieve.
I also long practiced what my mother preached to me throughout her life — be generous. Those values came into play throughout my career, but especially so as my philanthropic giving exceeded my substantial net worth in recent years.
For most of my adult life, I’ve believed that I was put on Earth to make money and be generous with it. I’ve never been a fan of inherited wealth. My family is taken care of, but I was far down this philanthropic road when, in 2010, Warren Buffet and Bill Gates asked me to take their Giving Pledge, a commitment by the world’s wealthiest to dedicate the majority of their wealth to philanthropy. I agreed immediately.
I liked knowing that I helped a lot of people. I received letters every day thanking me for what I did, the change I fostered in other people’s lives. Those people should know that I appreciated their letters.
My wealth was built through some key principles, including:
  • A good work ethic is critical.
  • Don’t think competition is bad, but play by the rules. I loved to compete and win. I never wanted the other guy to do badly; I just wanted to do a little better than he did.
  • Learn to analyze well. Assess the risks and the prospective rewards, and keep it simple.
  • Be willing to make decisions. That’s the most important quality in a good leader: Avoid the “Ready-aim-aim-aim-aim” syndrome. You have to be willing to fire.
  • Learn from mistakes. That’s not just a cliché. I sure made my share. Remember the doors that smashed your fingers the first time and be more careful the next trip through.
  • Be humble. I always believed the higher a monkey climbs in the tree, the more people below can see his ass. You don’t have to be that monkey.
  • Don’t look to government to solve problems — the strength of this country is in its people.
  • Stay fit. You don’t want to get old and feel bad. You’ll also get a lot more accomplished and feel better about yourself if you stay fit. I didn’t make it to 91 by neglecting my health.
  • Embrace change. Although older people are generally threatened by change, young people loved me because I embraced change rather than running from it. Change creates opportunity.
  • Have faith, both in spiritual matters and in humanity, and in yourself. That faith will see you through the dark times we all navigate.
Over the years, my staff got used to hearing me in a meeting or on the phone asking, “Whaddya got?” That’s probably what my Maker is asking me about now.
Here’s my best answer.
I left an undying love for America, and the hope it presents for all. I left a passion for entrepreneurship, and the promise it sustains. I left the belief that future generations can and will do better than my own.
Thank you. It’s time we all move on.
 
Last edited:

VCU Heel

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And IBM shouldn't have worried about Apple or Microsoft in the 80s. If I would bet against any of those men it would be against Musk. He is his own worst enemy.
SpaceX is going to have cornered the market in reusable rockets before Blue Origin even gets an orbital flight up. There’s a reason why Bezos has been throwing a fit with dumb court filings the last few weeks. They’re only 17,400mph away from reaching LEO. LOL

What Virgin Galactic is doing is just a gimmicky tourist business. I’m sure they’ll make some money off of it, but it’s just not in the same class as SpaceX who is about to launch the largest, most powerful rocket in human history and it will eventually be 100% reusable.
 

rammad90

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It also takes the university and the athletic department agreeing to allow that eccentric multi-billionaire to do it. Some schools will have varying opinions on all of this. While football/basketball money is pretty big, it pales in comparison to the money these schools bring in each year from donations and research grants.

Its pretty clear that the schools that were paying under the table will do so now that there is more opportunity to funnel money directly to the kid to come play for X.

Yes, the IVIes are amongst the wealthiest. However, they have never expressed an interested in buying talent at least not for the traditional revenue generating sports. As an alum, I can tell you they look at college sports the same way many do HS sports. They are fun but. . .
So they are off the table regardless.

Now as to the SEC, Big Ten, ACC, and other so called powers yeah they will try to pony up and as stated if they were doing it under the table they will now just do it out in the open. Expect quite a few "heck of an offer's" going coming out of LSU.

However, VCU isnt the little sisters of the poor. The same U has alum that can donate over 2 billion which amounts to one of the largest in the Country. If we decided to pony up for Basketball we most assuredly could.
 

rammad90

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Since we brought up Pickens, this is too good not too share. Very wise and heartfelt words he left us on how short and precious life is.

The following message from T. Boone Pickens was written prior to his passing on September 11, 2019.

If you are reading this, I have passed on from this world — not as big a deal for you as it was for me.
In my final months, I came to the sad reality that my life really did have a fourth quarter and the clock really would run out on me. I took the time to convey some thoughts that reflect back on my rich and full life.
I was able to amass 1.9 million Linkedin followers. On Twitter, more than 145,000 (thanks, Drake). This is my goodbye to each of you.
One question I was asked time and again: What is it that you will leave behind?
That’s at the heart of one of my favorite poems, “Indispensable Man,” which Saxon White Kessinger wrote in 1959. Here are a few stanzas that get to the heart of the matter:
Sometime when you feel that your going
Would leave an unfillable hole,
Just follow these simple instructions
And see how they humble your soul;
Take a bucket and fill it with water,
Put your hand in it up to the wrist,
Pull it out and the hole that’s remaining
Is a measure of how you’ll be missed.
You can splash all you wish when you enter,
You may stir up the water galore,
But stop and you’ll find that in no time
It looks quite the same as before.

You be the judge of how long the bucket remembers me.
I’ve long recognized the power of effective communication. That’s why in my later years I began to reflect on the many life lessons I learned along the way, and shared them with all who would listen.
Fortunately, I found the young have a thirst for this message. Many times over the years, I was fortunate enough to speak at student commencement ceremonies, and that gave me the chance to look out into a sea of the future and share some of these thoughts with young minds. My favorite of these speeches included my grandchildren in the audience.
What I would tell them was this Depression-era baby from tiny Holdenville, Oklahoma — that wide expanse where the pavement ends, the West begins, and the Rock Island crosses the Frisco — lived a pretty good life.
In those speeches, I’d always offer these future leaders a deal: I would trade them my wealth and success, my 68,000-acre ranch and private jet, in exchange for their seat in the audience. That way, I told them, I’d get the opportunity to start over, experience every opportunity America has to offer.
It’s your shot now.
If I had to single out one piece of advice that’s guided me through life, most likely it would be from my grandmother, Nellie Molonson. She always made a point of making sure I understood that on the road to success, there’s no point in blaming others when you fail.
Here’s how she put it:
“Sonny, I don’t care who you are. Some day you’re going to have to sit on your own bottom.”
After more than half a century in the energy business, her advice has proven itself to be spot-on time and time again. My failures? I never have any doubt whom they can be traced back to. My successes? Most likely the same guy.
Never forget where you come from. I was fortunate to receive the right kind of direction, leadership, and work ethic — first in Holdenville, then as a teen in Amarillo, Texas, and continuing in college at what became Oklahoma State University. I honored the values my family instilled in me, and was honored many times over by the success they allowed me to achieve.
I also long practiced what my mother preached to me throughout her life — be generous. Those values came into play throughout my career, but especially so as my philanthropic giving exceeded my substantial net worth in recent years.
For most of my adult life, I’ve believed that I was put on Earth to make money and be generous with it. I’ve never been a fan of inherited wealth. My family is taken care of, but I was far down this philanthropic road when, in 2010, Warren Buffet and Bill Gates asked me to take their Giving Pledge, a commitment by the world’s wealthiest to dedicate the majority of their wealth to philanthropy. I agreed immediately.
I liked knowing that I helped a lot of people. I received letters every day thanking me for what I did, the change I fostered in other people’s lives. Those people should know that I appreciated their letters.
My wealth was built through some key principles, including:
  • A good work ethic is critical.
  • Don’t think competition is bad, but play by the rules. I loved to compete and win. I never wanted the other guy to do badly; I just wanted to do a little better than he did.
  • Learn to analyze well. Assess the risks and the prospective rewards, and keep it simple.
  • Be willing to make decisions. That’s the most important quality in a good leader: Avoid the “Ready-aim-aim-aim-aim” syndrome. You have to be willing to fire.
  • Learn from mistakes. That’s not just a cliché. I sure made my share. Remember the doors that smashed your fingers the first time and be more careful the next trip through.
  • Be humble. I always believed the higher a monkey climbs in the tree, the more people below can see his ass. You don’t have to be that monkey.
  • Don’t look to government to solve problems — the strength of this country is in its people.
  • Stay fit. You don’t want to get old and feel bad. You’ll also get a lot more accomplished and feel better about yourself if you stay fit. I didn’t make it to 91 by neglecting my health.
  • Embrace change. Although older people are generally threatened by change, young people loved me because I embraced change rather than running from it. Change creates opportunity.
  • Have faith, both in spiritual matters and in humanity, and in yourself. That faith will see you through the dark times we all navigate.
Over the years, my staff got used to hearing me in a meeting or on the phone asking, “Whaddya got?” That’s probably what my Maker is asking me about now.
Here’s my best answer.
I left an undying love for America, and the hope it presents for all. I left a passion for entrepreneurship, and the promise it sustains. I left the belief that future generations can and will do better than my own.
Thank you. It’s time we all move on.
This is powerful and even at my advancing age provides lessons and advice I can use.
 

rammad90

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And IBM shouldn't have worried about Apple or Microsoft in the 80s. If I would bet against any of those men it would be against Musk. He is his own worst enemy.
Ramaholic,

I agree with you for the most part. Yes, there might not be an actual space race. However, those three you mentioned are in a race that most certainly is larger. They are in a race for relevance and influence.

This is something that Bill Gates is oh much more subtle in pursuing.

Fwiw, givne their repesective tract records its tought to bet against any of them. However, I do agree that Musk seems the most likely to make a bonehead move.
 

VCU Heel

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Ramaholic,

I agree with you for the most part. Yes, there might not be an actual space race. However, those three you mentioned are in a race that most certainly is larger. They are in a race for relevance and influence.

This is something that Bill Gates is oh much more subtle in pursuing.

Fwiw, givne their repesective tract records its tought to bet against any of them. However, I do agree that Musk seems the most likely to make a bonehead move.
Musk is the face and voice of SpaceX, but there are a lot of other people making the technical decisions for that company. They’re on an amazing pace and they’re getting all of the important NASA contracts now. They’ll be doing the first launch of Starship atop the heavy booster in the next month (pending FTA approval), which will be twice as powerful as the Jupiter rockets and eventually totally reusable. Blue Origin looked promising about 10 years ago, but they’ve totally floundered.
 

PRock

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Ramaholic,

I agree with you for the most part. Yes, there might not be an actual space race. However, those three you mentioned are in a race that most certainly is larger. They are in a race for relevance and influence.

This is something that Bill Gates is oh much more subtle in pursuing.

Fwiw, givne their repesective tract records its tought to bet against any of them. However, I do agree that Musk seems the most likely to make a bonehead move.
Musk is also the one most likely to make the kind of breakthrough move that may benefit mankind for the better. Branson is the modern day PT Barnum (positive) but it’s not clear that he is fully committed to the long term and Bezos is just a complete a$$hat—smart, motivated and greedy, but a total tool as a person. My money is on Elon….quirky, but the most committed of the bunch.
 

BradRamFan

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SpaceX is going to have cornered the market in reusable rockets before Blue Origin even gets an orbital flight up. There’s a reason why Bezos has been throwing a fit with dumb court filings the last few weeks. They’re only 17,400mph away from reaching LEO. LOL

What Virgin Galactic is doing is just a gimmicky tourist business. I’m sure they’ll make some money off of it, but it’s just not in the same class as SpaceX who is about to launch the largest, most powerful rocket in human history and it will eventually be 100% reusable.
Virgin's ultimate goal is to use/develop craft that get to space and come down in a different area....like US to Japan and do it in a few hours. Plane size would be limited....more of a business commuter.
I also believe we will end up needing something akin to the Blue Origin landing platform. If you want to land a rover, supplies and/or limited volumes of equipment, do you really need to send something up the size of SpaceX machine? I also wonder how it will land in lunar regolith or landing on an angle. Not saying it is not possible to land the spaceX rocket on the moon but there are a number of technicalities that need to be worked out. And right now it is just one big huge gas tank.....although probably won't need all that gas for lunar landing and takeoff.
 

VCU Heel

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Virgin's ultimate goal is to use/develop craft that get to space and come down in a different area....like US to Japan and do it in a few hours. Plane size would be limited....more of a business commuter.
I also believe we will end up needing something akin to the Blue Origin landing platform. If you want to land a rover, supplies and/or limited volumes of equipment, do you really need to send something up the size of SpaceX machine? I also wonder how it will land in lunar regolith or landing on an angle. Not saying it is not possible to land the spaceX rocket on the moon but there are a number of technicalities that need to be worked out. And right now it is just one big huge gas tank.....although probably won't need all that gas for lunar landing and takeoff.
StarShip will be able to do what you’re describing for Virgin, but with hundreds of passengers at a time.

They’ll make the landing legs on StarShip so they can land on uneven ground on Mars and the Moon, but eventually they’re planning to build the same large takeoff/landing towers like they’re building in Texas. The plan is to actually catch the rockets with large arms on the tower. The StarShip is also going to have smaller rockets towards the top of the ship and wouldn’t land with the rockets that it uses for takeoff and propulsion in space. This would allow landing on the surface without turning the regolith into billions of tiny sharp rocks being shot around at hundreds or thousands of miles per hour.

Being a big huge has tank is essentially what all rockets are. Fuel is really the biggest issue when it comes to getting off of Earth and getting around through space. StarShip will be doing multiple refuels in space, which is something that has never been done. It will definitely be a challenge, but I’m confident they‘ll be able to do it eventually.
 

BradRamFan

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StarShip will be able to do what you’re describing for Virgin, but with hundreds of passengers at a time.

They’ll make the landing legs on StarShip so they can land on uneven ground on Mars and the Moon, but eventually they’re planning to build the same large takeoff/landing towers like they’re building in Texas.
The tower is for the booster (1st stage), not the crewed/starship section.
 

VCU Heel

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rammad90

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Musk is also the one most likely to make the kind of breakthrough move that may benefit mankind for the better. Branson is the modern day PT Barnum (positive) but it’s not clear that he is fully committed to the long term and Bezos is just a complete a$$hat—smart, motivated and greedy, but a total tool as a person. My money is on Elon….quirky, but the most committed of the bunch.
Musk is risk or reward. As such, I do agree that he may make a breakthrough. But as Ramaholic and I agree both agree he is more likely than the other two to make a mistake.
 

VCU Heel

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Musk is risk or reward. As such, I do agree that he may make a breakthrough. But as Ramaholic and I agree both agree he is more likely than the other two to make a mistake.
It’s not like he’s designing the rockets himself. LOL
 

PRock

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Musk is risk or reward. As such, I do agree that he may make a breakthrough. But as Ramaholic and I agree both agree he is more likely than the other two to make a mistake.
Give me the guy willing to try and risk failure over anyone unwilling to take a moonshot any day of the week and twice on Sunday. Heck, there were quite a few “pragmatic” voices ‘round here when it came to Bones shooting his shot for the league.
 
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