Players Time to have a conversation

PRock

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Feb 9, 2010
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One of the reasons our beloved sports entities are becoming part of the epicenter for social discourse on matters of race and social justice is that most of the leagues and college sports are places where disaffected groups have the platform, critical mass and intellect to represent the messages More effectively. If that turns people off, so be it, as long as it raises awareness and influences more dialogue.

Politics and sports are intermixed components of modern society both good and bad. In some cases it highlights the worst of society—-like when we look at the racial make-up of the labor pool (players) relative to representation at the middle management (coaches, GMs, ADs) and leadership (owners, University leadership) levels. In other ways, locker rooms show the progress of our society with respect to how relations across different races and backgrounds can be furthered for the better when focused on a common objective.

Like it or not, sports and politics have been mixed since Jack Johnson was knocking out all comers and still couldn’t get a good steak in the south. Personally, I don’t see how personal expression that stays within the bounds of decency has any impact on enjoying the game— why look for a fight, when there is great game on the floor?
 
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Havoc City

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We all make our choices and have our beliefs, I respect that yours are different than mine, no sweat for either of us. Per your last sentence, I don’t think anyone should expect their mind to be expanded by a slogan on the back of an 18-24 year old, but opening oneself to the possibility, is the mark of a truly open mind.
Quick question: are you following your own advice and opening yourself up to VCU85's position? I mean, if you're going to lecture him/her/they about being open minded, shouldn't you lead by example?
 

PRock

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Quick question: are you following your own advice and opening yourself up to VCU85's position? I mean, if you're going to lecture him/her/they about being open minded, shouldn't you lead by example?
I respect their position and believe they are coming at it from a genuine perspective. Hardly a lecture, OP was my own perspective and VCU85 engaged with a response. That’s called dialogue.

FWIW- as a former SA who played beyond campus for several years, I fully understand and appreciate the team first POV. I also appreciate that some are uncomfortable with players using the stage for personal purposes. I don’t find it an unreasonable perspective nor do i think it is indicative of a character flaw. I simply have a different perspective that we recruit a person as well as a player and i’m cool with their having avenues for expression. Most are pretty sharp and thoughtful guys—for the most part one doesn’t reach the level of excellence they have without having it all together. I choose to support the opportunity for them to express themselves. Then, if there are knuckleheads and it turns into a cluster, i’m cool with being wrong and adjusting my perspective.
 

rammad90

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Jan 19, 2010
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With respect, this is a red herring.

One would hope that we are capable of keeping two thoughts in our head at the same time. I can simultaneously be outraged by what China is doing to the Wiegers and by what it means to deploy border patrol agents in Portland. If we can't address multiple topics at once, we are in trouble because we have multiple crises going on right now.
Well stated!
 
May 5, 2009
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I respect their position and believe they are coming at it from a genuine perspective. Hardly a lecture, OP was my own perspective and VCU85 engaged with a response. That’s called dialogue.

FWIW- as a former SA who played beyond campus for several years, I fully understand and appreciate the team first POV. I also appreciate that some are uncomfortable with players using the stage for personal purposes. I don’t find it an unreasonable perspective nor do i think it is indicative of a character flaw. I simply have a different perspective that we recruit a person as well as a player and i’m cool with their having avenues for expression. Most are pretty sharp and thoughtful guys—for the most part one doesn’t reach the level of excellence they have without having it all together. I choose to support the opportunity for them to express themselves. Then, if there are knuckleheads and it turns into a cluster, i’m cool with being wrong and adjusting my perspective.
Sorry I disagree. There are plenty of outlets for the players to express their thoughts or support. When I go to a sporting event, I want to watch the game and not be distracted. If it comes to fruition, I would consider not buying season tickets and declining to make the annual pledge.
 

rammad90

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For all you young, broke, bummy dudes out there, take some advice from your Uncle Ramaholic. I don't care if you are a machine gun toting 2A advocate wasting an entire work day talking to delegates who already decided how they stand on the 2A or a police brutality protester heck bent of marching for your 65th straight night. Parading around, screaming at others that don't agree with you is not time well spent. Your most successful people tend to be discreet about politics. Instead they focus on using there time to better themselves and try to get along with as many people as possible. Industriousness and likeability are 2 of the most important markers in people that become financially and professionally successful. If you want to spend time attending rallies or put yourselves in the crosshairs of divisive political poop storms, don't be complaining 10 years from now on how your career or financial life isnt what you feel you deserve. Instead own the choices you made and be the best darn, broke, bummy dude you can be!
I'd like to think that your schools, teachers, educational systems would tell you this, but apparently they are more interested in using your future as pawns for there agendas.

Sincerely,

Uncle Ramaholic
So just shut up get to work and let the system stay the same. Ok for some but not others. The main issue here is some people can't achieve success no matter how industrious or likable.

Fwiw, liability is relative. If someone prefers the present system they might not like the guy or gal who doesnt. What if the system is flawed and/or broken. Your advice is just work hard and keep smiling.

At the end of the day, no one really wants to protest. Most would prefer to relax, or even have a beer. What we all need to understand or think about is why are these kids out there protesting? Any merit to the protest? Why are they angry and merit to the anger?

We shouldn't just accept the system because it worked or has worked for us. We shouldn't condemn when an entire group or groups are systematically excluded from the full benefits of being an American citizen.

I actually think the reason there is protest is the fact that schools, teachers, and educations systems have informed students, rightfully so, that they actually have the right to speak out and protest. Protest is in fact what started our great Republic.
 

Ramaholic

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Mar 8, 2010
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So just shut up get to work and let the system stay the same. Ok for some but not others. The main issue here is some people can't achieve success no matter how industrious or likable.

Fwiw, liability is relative. If someone prefers the present system they might not like the guy or gal who doesnt. What if the system is flawed and/or broken. Your advice is just work hard and keep smiling.

At the end of the day, no one really wants to protest. Most would prefer to relax, or even have a beer. What we all need to understand or think about is why are these kids out there protesting? Any merit to the protest? Why are they angry and merit to the anger?

We shouldn't just accept the system because it worked or has worked for us. We shouldn't condemn when an entire group or groups are systematically excluded from the full benefits of being an American citizen.

I actually think the reason there is protest is the fact that schools, teachers, and educations systems have informed students, rightfully so, that they actually have the right to speak out and protest. Protest is in fact what started our great Republic.
Protests and freedom of speech did shape this country. Sleeping in tents all day, staying up all night disrupting traffic, yelling chants at houses of people that disagree with you till the early morning, throwing bricks at police, breaking windows, arson, grafitting everything (state property/ private property)... is not a protest. It is a riot. I am having a hard time identifying what is going on in Richmond as a legitimate protest. Sure there are some legitimate protestors there. But overall, when the the group marches there is a wake of destruction that follows them. I have seen all sorts of protests over the years. There are protests for workers rights, pro abortion, Anti abortion, Tea party, Anti-Trump, Dominion Pipeline... and none of them have come close to the destructive nature that these "peaceful" protesters have had on our city since late May. If I am wrong and Richmond has seen such destruction in the past 30 years, please correct me. Parts of Richmond looks like a war zone and that is disgusting. There are some vital concerns that have been raised and need to be addressed, but this crap in its current state needs to stop and take the true form of a protest and not a riot.
 
May 5, 2009
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Protests and freedom of speech did shape this country. Sleeping in tents all day, staying up all night disrupting traffic, yelling chants at houses of people that disagree with you till the early morning, throwing bricks at police, breaking windows, arson, grafitting everything... is not a protest. it is a riot. I am having a hard time identifying what is going on in Richmond as a legitimate protest. Sure there are some legitimate protestors there. But overall, when the the group marches there is a wake of destruction that follows them. I have seen all sorts of protests over the years. There are peaceful protests for workers rights, pro abortion, Anti abortion, Tea party, Anti-Trump, Dominion Pipeline... and none of them have come close to the destructive nature that these "peaceful" protesters have had on our city since late May. If I am wrong and Richmond has seen such destruction in the past, please correct me. parts of Richmond looks like a war zone and that is disgusting. There are some vital concerns that have been raised and need to be addressed, but this crap in its current state needs to stop and take the true form of a protest and not a riot.
I have noticed that there are only about a half a dozen posters that participate on this thread. Lack of interest by Ram Nation and perhaps reason enough to move it to off topic.
 
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PRock

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Sorry I disagree. There are plenty of outlets for the players to express their thoughts or support. When I go to a sporting event, I want to watch the game and not be distracted. If it comes to fruition, I would consider not buying season tickets and declining to make the annual pledge.
that’s fair and a choice, if you choose to do so, i respect the resolve, but will work in earnest to replace your pledge.
 
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Havoc City

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If the NCAA really wanted to help black athletes and athletes of color, they'd pay them. This proposal from the NCAA about letting students wear some message seems to me to be little more than virtue signalling as a way to deflect attention away from substantive change. A note on a uniform changes nothing. It solves nothing. It's just another distraction.

Here's an SI article that was just published about how the NCAA robs black athletes of generational wealth.

 
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