Players Time to have a conversation

VCU85

Top Member
Jan 26, 2016
4,000
6,323
This over-generalizes A LOT of things, but aside from that, the fact is that no one should be ok with the systemic racism and police brutality that still exists and happens (again) every single day in this country, and that’s not an exaggeration. That’s also just ONE example of modern day racism in systems of power. I honestly don’t have faith in any politician to make it better, no matter political party or who they’re in bed with. It won’t matter. Corporations and public servants all need to be held accountable when employees who are supposed to serve the public are obviously racist, brutal, or both. Period. All systems have the power to fire and charge (when necessary) the people who abuse and kill other people. They just don’t. This is what people protest, as they should. I’m done hearing the excuses. It’s not hard. Fire racists. Fire murderers. It’s really that simple. The more bs excuses there are, the more it’s clear the problems don’t affect you guys. It’s fine but try to have some perspective. Lots of these victims have only committed the crime of being black. I’m done hearing the excuses.
My comment on the issues plaguing poor inner city families was an over generalization ? I don't think so. I think I was spot on listing the issues that affect them on a daily basis. Sure lots of inner city folks value education. In Richmond the graduation rate is 76%, the lowest in the state. That says more inner city folks don't care and or aren't able to care about education than other areas. My comments were meant more as a comparison to suburban, and or higher socio economic areas.
 
Last edited:

RamLover

Top Member
Dec 1, 2016
728
1,104
My comment on the issues plaguing poor inner city families was an over generalization ? I don't think so. I think I was spot on listing the issues that affect them on a daily basis.
I was speaking to all the things in your first paragraph, but one thing in your second paragraph is really not right, either. Lots of inner city families value education. A lot. It’s kind of messed up to assume they don’t because of a stereotype or a few who do not. Lots of non-inner city families do not value education, too. So, yes, that’s also an over-generalization. And the other problems you listed are definitely problems, and numbers of those things are probably higher in inner cities than suburbia, but not all families experience all of them. Our inner cities aren’t always in turmoil, guys. Some families choose to live in the city and don’t have issues. Lots of families in suburbia and rural areas experience some or all of these things, too. I get statistics, but I would just try to avoid language that implies that because these problems exist, that should spill into their leadership. If anything, if those problems do exist, their leadership should be fighting even harder for their benefit and maybe help try to examine WHY there might be more of those problems within the city than on the outskirts and help work to fix it.
 
Last edited:

VCU85

Top Member
Jan 26, 2016
4,000
6,323
I was speaking to all the things in your first paragraph.
Media packaging everything in little sound bites ? Far too many do that. Many also don't provide news anymore, they provide a point of view PACKAGED AS NEWS they want to push. I've actually heard interviews recently (on NPR no less) from journalism professors, and journalists who say who, what, when where and why is an out dated method of reporting.

Civics isn't being taught in schools by most school systems.

So what was the over generalization ?
 
  • Like
Reactions: RoyVa

RamLover

Top Member
Dec 1, 2016
728
1,104
Media packaging everything in little sound bites ? Far too many do that. Many also don't provide news anymore, they provide a point of view PACKAGED AS NEWS they want to push. I've actually heard interviews recently (on NPR no less) from journalism professors, and journalists who say who, what, when where and why is an out dated method of reporting.

Civics isn't being taught in schools by most school systems.

So what was the over generalization ?
Sure, the media problem exists, but it’s not always edited or contrived. Sometimes what you see is what happened. People like to think it’s contrived when it doesn’t fit with what they want to accept. Try to find a trustworthy news source or a healthy mix of all sides. Don’t fall to echo chambers.

Civics is taught in schools, it’s just usually called “government.”

Not sure why you mentioned math teachers teaching politics. That sounds like an experience from one math teacher you may have had.

Lots of people can and do think freely and are not being manipulated. I agree some people are, but lots see their views because of measured approaches to reach them.

Also I added more to my original response after you saw this. It’s a little over-generalizing to assume the problems of all inner-city families. I personally know hundreds of inner-city families that value education, mainly because they know how important it is if one does not receive it. If I know that’s a common misconception about inner-city families, I know there may be many, many others. Even when some of those issues exist for some of those families, it’s because their politicians are working against them, and that’s obviously not what they promised when running for their political seats. It’s not just DC. It’s all over. People shouldn’t be held accountable for the failures of their politicians or those who oppress them.
 
  • Like
Reactions: vcumad

duncanlamb

Top Member
Insider
Apr 22, 2009
17,455
20,411
[
Agree to disagree. Some people can be active voters who do their research and vote for the candidate who pledges to help the causes in which they believe. If a different candidate wins or the one they trusted becomes corrupt, they shouldn’t be blamed for the oppression they continue to suffer. This is just another way to not hold the people doing the oppressing accountable.
My views continue to evolve on this subject. Yes, there is systemic racism in the police and here is concrete evidence

Race arrest quotas! I am surprised no one has been talking about this policy.



"
Hunting at the border.”

It’s a term the I-Team has been told North Brunswick police officers privately use to describe a practice they say went on for years in their Township. What they are referring to is the border between North and New Brunswick and roads that are often heavily traveled by minorities.

Veteran police officer Mike Campbell said that cops would target black and Latino neighborhoods to fulfill ticket quotas and claims there was a financial reward to rack up numbers. The more tickets, the more money officers would receive in overtime pay. ".




The commander in question, Constantin Tsachas, was in charge of more than 100 officers between 2011 and 2015. The district he commanded spanned much of south Brooklyn, including the diverse neighborhoods of Sunset Park, Flatbush and Brighton Beach.


According to signed affidavits, which were gathered in the last few months as part of the lawsuit, Mr. Tsachas, who is now a deputy inspector, pressured subordinates to enforce minor violations like fare evasion against black and Hispanic people.

He discouraged them from doing the same with white or Asian people, the affidavits said.

“I got tired of hunting Black and Hispanic people because of arrest quotas,” one former officer, Christopher LaForce, said in his affidavit, explaining his decision to retire in 2015.


"
Enforcement on the subway has surged over the past year. Police officers issued 22,000 more tickets for fare evasion this year compared with 2018, The Times reported.

Hundreds more officers have also been deployed in the transit system in recent months, sparking debate about overpolicing and the criminalization of poverty. Black and Hispanic people had already accounted for an outsize number of arrests on the subway.


Governor Cuomo has been sharply criticized for the expanded deployment, as the Metropolitan Transportation Authority is facing a looming financial crisis and struggles to provide reliable subway service.".

In other words. Governor Cuomo was using race arrest quotas to generate revenue and raise money and balance the books of the New York transit system?
 
Last edited:

RamLover

Top Member
Dec 1, 2016
728
1,104
My comment on the issues plaguing poor inner city families was an over generalization ? I don't think so. I think I was spot on listing the issues that affect them on a daily basis. Sure lots of inner city folks value education. In Richmond the graduation rate is 76%, the lowest in the state. That says more inner city folks don't care and or aren't able to care about education than other areas. My comments were meant more as a comparison to suburban, and or higher socio economic areas.
Thanks for listening, changing your language, and clarifying here, but I still disagree. It’s not that they aren’t able to care. Very few don’t care. It’s that their families (and the students) are sometimes in positions that make school impossible or make it seem impossible. It’s not so simple for some. It’s cycles of bad decisions, sometimes, but one must examine all the circumstances that force the kids who drop out to have to make certain decisions at all. And you said it right there. Of course when you compare it to higher socioeconomic areas, you’re going to see the effects of people living with less, and it’s not always their fault or that they don’t work hard enough or often enough. It’s clear that it’s a lack of opportunities and/or a lack of the resources/people/help to point them to better opportunities, all of which stems from systemic racism. It’s not impossible for people to succeed in these circumstances; it’s just much harder.
 

VCU85

Top Member
Jan 26, 2016
4,000
6,323
Thanks for listening, changing your language, and clarifying here, but I still disagree. It’s not that they aren’t able to care. Very few don’t care. It’s that their families (and the students) are sometimes in positions that make school impossible or make it seem impossible. It’s not so simple for some. It’s cycles of bad decisions, sometimes, but one must examine all the circumstances that force the kids who drop out to have to make certain decisions at all. And you said it right there. Of course when you compare it to higher socioeconomic areas, you’re going to see the effects of people living with less, and it’s not always their fault or that they don’t work hard enough or often enough. It’s clear that it’s a lack of opportunities and/or a lack of the resources/people/help to point them to better opportunities, all of which stems from systemic racism. It’s not impossible for people to succeed in these circumstances; it’s just much harder.
We're gonna have to agree to disagree. I've seen too much actual first hand experience of the lack of educational value to believe it's not a problem.
 

Ramdog

Top Member
Feb 10, 2009
6,985
14,015
Go to RPS PTA meeting....eye opening

And if people really want to support ...this is the kind of place the real work needs to be done...walking around at night screaming "Phuck the police" is getting no help to those that need it...wasted energy ....education is the only true way up
 
Last edited:

RamLover

Top Member
Dec 1, 2016
728
1,104
We're gonna have to agree to disagree. I've seen too much actual first hand experience of the lack of educational value to believe it's not a problem.
I agree it’s a problem; I just think it’s not as widespread in these families as you think, and/or it’s a result of bigger issues that have been dealt.
 

Violet Ram

Top Member
Jan 29, 2015
1,514
2,670
In other words. Governor Cuomo was using race arrest quotas to generate revenue and raise money and balance the books of the New York transit system?
No, that's not what the article you linked argues. It discussed two separate issues: (a) an NYPD commander from 2011 to 2015 was instructing officers to act in a racist fashion; and (b) that the MTA is increasing it's enforcement of fare jumpers.

These are two very different topics. First, NYPD is under the city's management, which has nothing to do with Cuomo or state government. Second, the State/MTA actions aren't facially discriminatory. They are trying to universally crack down on fare jumpers, regardless of race. This has a disparate impact on minorities because of the long-term socio-economic impacts of racism.

Personally, I agree with Cuomo's actions. The NYC subway is one of the most extensive and cheapest transit systems in the US. It's long-term viability is based, in part, on being able to collect a small fee from all users. If a large portion of riders jump the tolls, it can have a severe impact on the revenue the MTA collects and can use to clean and operate the subway. There are only really three options to make up the shortfall: (1) increase public subsidies to the MTA, which would be fine if it wasn't so politically toxic to do so; (2) have stronger enforcement of toll jumpers, which is causing a very minor stir; or (3) Increase the tolls on those who do pay to compensate for toll jumpers, which would have an even stronger 'racist' impact since it would hurt law-abiding low-income individuals the most.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rammed and PRock

BaNgMyPrOgRaM

Top Member
Insider
Mar 27, 2009
19,202
10,770
I don't know if some of yall saw this but here it is...


As a black VCU fan for over a decade, I've heard, seen, and personally experienced racist actions by other VCU fans.

Now in 2020, as this country is coming to a reckoning around structural racism, white supremacy, and the devaluing of black people, we as a VCU community have to start looking at ourselves.

No longer should any of us remain silence and allow members of our VCU community to use racist language, condone symbols of white supremacy, or continue to devalue black people. I think we can all point to examples, in particular instances on this board, of when racist actions or statements have occured.

No longer should can we allow this. We must fight back and call out racism when it happens, even when it happens within our VCU community.
Are we done?
 

Havoc City

Top Member
Nov 8, 2014
1,666
3,668
Are we done?
I sent vadiplomat04 the following private message about a week ago: "You say you want a conversation, and then one erupts and you don't participate in it. You've been silent now for 10 days. Did you really want to have a conversation, or were you just trying to virtue signal and stir things up? That's an honest question, btw."

He/she/they finally wrote me back the other day. This was the message in full: "Yall are doing great! Keep the conversation going!"

The person is clearly not interested in engaging in an actual conversation.
 

RowdyPkunk

Top Member
May 19, 2009
21,115
18,569
I sent vadiplomat04 the following private message about a week ago: "You say you want a conversation, and then one erupts and you don't participate in it. You've been silent now for 10 days. Did you really want to have a conversation, or were you just trying to virtue signal and stir things up? That's an honest question, btw."

He/she/they finally wrote me back the other day. This was the message in full: "Yall are doing great! Keep the conversation going!"

The person is clearly not interested in engaging in an actual conversation.
I coulda told you that. I responded to him on Page 3 back on the 16th... more than 10 days ago.... and they have not responded to me either in this chat or privately. Other people have been responding to their post on here.... and no responses to any of them either. Pretty much sounds like they wanted to get the talk going, but wanted no part of the actual talking themselves. They just started it, to make themselves look good & get their 2 cents in first, so people can't say they were being quiet on the subject.